Auto body shopin James Island, SC

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The Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration Difference

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

One of the unfortunate realities about driving and owning cars in the Lowcountry is that you will probably have to deal with some form of body damage at some point. Whether your driver-side door gets dinged in a parking lot or you back into a light pole, accidents happen. The good news? Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration is here to help with all of your body shop needs.

Unlike many fly-by-night collision repair companies, our auto body shop in cityname, state has served hardworking people for years. We make it a point to only employ the most experienced, highly-trained auto body technicians available, so you have peace of mind that we'll get the job done right. In fact, our mechanics have more than 60 years of combined experience. There is no collision repair job that we haven't handled - from minor bumps and scratches to complex repairs stemming from multi-car accidents.

At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we are committed to providing our customers with the highest-quality body shop services at the most reasonable prices in town. We believe that everyone deserves to have their car or truck repaired when they need it the most. After all, our vehicles are crucial to daily life. We need them to live, work and play. We use them for just about every activity we enjoy, from taking the kids to soccer practice to hitting the gym on a Saturday morning. That's why we work with just about every car insurance company out there to ensure that our loyal customers have access to the best collision repair in South Carolina.

Customers choose Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration because they know we strive to exceed their expectations. At the end of the day, we want to do right by our customers with reliable body shop services, high-quality repair work, and helpful customer service. But that's not all. Our clients enjoy peace of mind with their collision repairs because we:

auto body shop Services

SERVICE AREAS

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Provide Free Estimates: Drop by our shop or call our office to learn more about our free estimates. Once we understand the scope of your restoration needs, our team will get to work.

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Offer 100% Guarantee: We have become a staple in our community because we guarantee our work 100%. If we missed the mark, made a mistake, or you're unhappy with our service, let us know. We'll make it right.

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Specialize in Full-Service Repairs: Our collision mechanics make repairs on all vehicle makes and models, so you don't have to worry about whether we can service your car. As a full-service collision repair company in South Carolina, we help every step of the way, from the moment we meet until you leave our parking lot.

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Love to Paint: Yes, you read that right. At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we have a team of incredibly talented car painters to supplement our collision services. We offer various auto painting services, from minor paint jobs to full-scale custom paint projects.

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Accept Car Insurance: As daily drivers and locals in South Carolina, we know that collision repairs can be pricey. Despite the cost, they are necessary for daily life. That's why we're happy to work with car insurance companies, so you can go where you need to go without stressing about safety.

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Work Hard for You: At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we try to keep it simple. You can rest easy knowing that there's no fine print, sleazy sales tactics, or lazy mechanics to worry about. When you pull into our parking lot, know that we prioritize good old-fashioned hard work and reliable service. No if's, and's, or but's.

Your First Choice for Collision
Repair in James Island, SC

According to recent statistics from the South Carolina Department of Public Safety, a new traffic accident happens every 3.7 minutes in South Carolina. That's a lot of car accidents in a short amount of time. Being involved in a car accident can be a traumatic experience, filled with complex insurance claims and complicated auto body repairs. At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we know how stressful it can be to have your care restored to its pre-collision beauty. That's why we offer comprehensive, streamlined auto body services and unsurpassed car restoration quality.

With more than 60 years of combined body shop experience in South Carolina, our repair techs leave no stones unturned and never take shortcuts when repairing your vehicle. We're proud to say we only use the latest diagnostic techniques, equipment, and parts to get the job done right. That way, you can get back on the road quickly and safely.

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

A few of our most common auto body shop services include but are not limited to:

Frame Repair in James Island

Studies show that about 50 percent of vehicles suffer some kind of frame damage in a car collision. Frame damage can occur easily, even in common situations involving minor fender benders. Often, frame damage is difficult to see and can go unnoticed by insurance adjusters. The unfortunate truth is that even minor frame damage can put you, your family, your friends, and your car at risk when driving. When it goes unnoticed, it can often spell disaster for everyday drivers who might think their car is fine to drive.

When your car's frame is bent, your alignment is usually off, too, causing you to swerve and veer while driving. At best, this scenario results in unnecessary wear on your tires and, at worst, results in a car wreck. The bottom line? You need to get your car's frame inspected by a team of professional collision repair experts, even if you've only been involved in a minor accident.

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we take a comprehensive approach to frame repair and alignment. Our highly-trained frame repair technicians use a multi-point process to diagnose and correct your frame problems by:

  • Inspecting your car and its frame visually to discover any denting or bending.
  • Our alignment machine uses hydraulics and torque to strengthen your car's frame back to factory specs.
  • If our technicians spot damage, we'll begin the restoration process by placing your car on our frame alignment machine.
  • Once your frame is fixed, we'll answer any of your questions and will send you back on the road with a safe-to-drive vehicle.

Your First Choice for Collision Repair in James Island, SC

Chips and cracks are bad news for your car's windshield and don't just look bad - they can do serious damage when left unrepaired. Cracks and chips can quickly turn from a minor inconvenience to a safety hazard by impairing your vision. If your windshield crack is bad enough, you might even get pulled over by a police officer. Driving your vehicle with a large crack or even with an object embedded in it is a bad idea, but Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration is here to help.

Our windshield repair technicians have years of experience repairing car windows and windshields for many types of automobile glass, including side and rear windows. If you have been involved in a collision and need new glass, we can help facilitate that process and install a new windshield without you ever lifting a finger. New glass is usually needed with serious car wrecks, and it's always best to trust a professional auto body shop in cityname, state to get the job done. Our team uses the most modern glass and adhesives on the market, so you know your windshield and windows are high-quality and ready for the road.

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

Whether you have a chipped windshield or need all-new glass for your car, we're here to serve you.
Out car windshield and glass repairs include:

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

Door Glass

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

Vent Glass

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

Quarter Glass

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

Back Glass

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

Windshield Glass

Paintless Dent Removal in James Island

Any kind of item or stray piece of debris can dent your car. If you've been driving for at least a few years, chances are you've parked at a grocery store and, after shopping, returned to your car to see a big, unsightly dent. Whether they're due to inclement weather or rocks on the highway, dents cause noticeable damage that only gets worse with time. One of the most common dent repair solutions is paintless dent removal - a process that removes dents in your vehicle without removing any paint.

Paintless dent removal is great because it is not invasive and is a very efficient, cost-effective way to fix car dents before they get even worse. There are no fillers or sanding involved, making this option one of the quickest ways to remove dents. At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, our dent removal technicians use several tools to gently massage dents out of your car. When we're done, we'll smooth everything back into place, leaving your car looking like new.

To make matters even better, most paintless dent removal is supported by car insurance agencies, meaning you may not pay a cent out of pocket for our dent removal services.

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

Classic Car Restoration
in James Island

At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we are very passionate about classic car restoration and offer a wide range of restoration services in James Island. We understand that no two classic car restoration projects are the same, which is why we offer a wide variety of services. We're talking mechanical upgrades, partial restorations, and full car restoration projects. If you have a repair, upgrade, or restoration plan in mind, chances are we can help you achieve your goals.

After we perform an initial inspection and provide you with a detailed estimate on the scope of work needed to restore your car, our seasoned technicians will get to work on your project.

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

Our full-scale classic car restoration process includes:

Auto Body Work Overhaul

Painting

Mechanical Repairs

Repair Interior

Custom Auto Body Painting in James Island

When was the last time you got compliments on your car's paint? If you loved your car's paint when it was brand new but hate what it looks like now, Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration can help you fall back in love with your vehicle. Whether your current paint job looks old and faded or you're craving a new color to show off, our paint technicians can deliver what you're looking for.

Between our advanced painting tools and uber-talented vehicle painting experts, our team can transform your car's aesthetic appeal, no matter the make and model. We can even fix dings and scratches in your paint while we're at it, so your car is shiny, smooth, and ready to turn heads.

We offer various auto painting services, from minor paint jobs to full-scale custom projects. We're happy to work with budgets of all sizes and can accommodate all of your painting needs, whether you want to paint a daily driver or a show car.

We recommend you call our office today, so we can get to know you a little better and understand what kind of paint job your car needs. We're happy to chat about cars and your paint job, even if you're just inquiring. After all, we're more than the best body shop in James Island - we're enthusiasts, too.

Auto Body Shop James Island, SC

Your First Choice for Collison
Repair in James Island, SC

If you're on the hunt for the highest-quality auto body repair services in South Carolina, backed by decades of experience, look no further than Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration. We put our customer's needs first and strive to exceed expectations with every service we offer - all at a price you can afford. Swing by our body shop or contact our office today to discover why we're the Lowcountry's first choice in collision repair.

Troop-Films-LLC-phone-number(843) 996-4995

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Latest News in James Island, SC

Thursday headlines: Breakaway churches ordered by high court to return property to national Episcopalians

Nearly a decade ago, more than two dozen parishes broke away from the national Episcopal Church. But on Wednesday after years of legal wrangling, the South Carolina Supreme Court ordered 14 of the 29 parishes that broke away must return its property to the Episcopal Church and its ...

Nearly a decade ago, more than two dozen parishes broke away from the national Episcopal Church. But on Wednesday after years of legal wrangling, the South Carolina Supreme Court ordered 14 of the 29 parishes that broke away must return its property to the Episcopal Church and its affiliated South Carolina diocese. The court also ordered turnover of Camp St. Christopher on Seabrook Island to the national church, which is represented by 29 parishes from Charleston to Columbia.

Among the breakaway churches in what is called the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina that will have to hand over their property include congregations in Charleston (Good Shepherd, Old St. Andrew’s, Holy Trinity) and Sumter, Walterboro, Hilton Head Island, Stateburg, Mount Pleasant (Christ Church) and James Island. Those not affected by the ruling include historic St. Phillip’s and St. Michael’s in downtown Charleston as well as churches in Bluffton, Beaufort, Conway, Summerville and Orangeburg.

In other recent headlines:

S.C. court halts execution by firing squad. The state Supreme Court issued a temporary stay on Wednesday, delaying its first-ever execution by firing squad due to a litigation in another court challenging the constitutionality of South Carolina’s execution methods.

S.C. Senate unanimously supports early voting. The South Carolina senate is showing unanimous, bipartisan support for an early voting bill that unanimously passed in the S.C. House in March. But in doing so, added that senators have the power to confirm the governor’s choices for the director and the five members of the board of the South Carolina Election Commission. The House is unlikely to approve the changes.

S.C. bill to curb abortions advances. The bill will give women 18 and older more access to birth control or other hormonal contraceptives by going directly to a pharmacist without a doctor’s prescription.

Proposal to bring new life to old West Ashley grocery store lot. The West Ashley Revitalization Commission heard a proposal on Monday of turning the old Piggly Wiggly property on Sam Rittenberg Blvd. into a community hub, consisting of small businesses, a restaurant with rooftop dining and city offices to the property.

Charleston residents want to limit student-style housing in neighborhoods. Charleston-area residents, mainly those who live in the downtown peninsula, attended a city planning commission meeting to join talks of developers building student-style housing from Radcliffe Street to Market Street. The City of Charleston proposed an overlay zone requiring more requirements for developers to purchase land and build housing.

To get dozens of South Carolina news stories every business day, contact the folks at SC Clips.

Help the City Paper keep delivering excellence

Winner of top 2021 state journalism honors (best editorial writing and best cartoon), the Charleston City Paper brings you the Best of Charleston every day. Support our “unafraid” journalism with a one-time donation or become a member of the City Paper Club.

Charleston County told to expect revised cost estimates for $2.3B Mark Clark Extension

State Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall said the new $2.35 billion price tag for the Mark Clark Extension could change within months in a presentation to Charleston County Council.For now, some county officials are choking on the idea of having to come up with $1.9 billion as Charleston County’s share of the road plan. An earlier, outdated estimate put the county’s cost share at $305 million.“I don’t know whether to laugh or to cry,” Councilman Henry Darby said. “I would never, ever go...

State Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall said the new $2.35 billion price tag for the Mark Clark Extension could change within months in a presentation to Charleston County Council.

For now, some county officials are choking on the idea of having to come up with $1.9 billion as Charleston County’s share of the road plan. An earlier, outdated estimate put the county’s cost share at $305 million.

“I don’t know whether to laugh or to cry,” Councilman Henry Darby said. “I would never, ever go with this.”

The long-planned Mark Clark Extension would extend Interstate 526 from its terminus at U.S. Highway 17 in West Ashley across the Stono River to Johns Island, where it would be a 45-mph parkway. Then it would cross the Stono River again to James Island, to connect with the James Island Connector at Folly Road.

The parkway would cover a distance of less than 8 miles, but the project involves two new bridges, connecting roads, wetlands and property acquisition costs that all drive up the price.

Under a 2019 agreement the county signed, the state’s share of the project is capped at $420 million, so all of the cost increase would be borne by the county. The last cost estimate was calculated in 2014. The project is slated for completion in 2035.

“I look forward to renegotiating with the state and looking for a path forward,” Councilwoman Jenny Honeycutt said.

The new estimate was sent to the county on April 25, and Hall went over the details at the council’s Finance Committee meeting May 5.

Hall stressed that with a large and complex road project, costs are difficult to nail down. She said DOT has reached out to road and bridge contractors to review the new estimate and expects to update the potential cost in 90 to 120 days.

Mark Clark Extension Project Director Jay Mattox said the $2.35 billion estimate was the result of a detailed and lengthy review.

“We ran this simulation that simulated the project tens of thousands of times and basically came up with $2.3 billion in all the different scenarios as the likely (maximum) cost,” Mattox said.

He said DOT came up with a base cost of $1.6 billion — the county’s share in that scenario would be $1.18 billion — then factored in things such as likely litigation and inflation.

“Even if our responsibility is $1.5 billion, that’s out of our league,” Councilman Dickie Schweers said. “We can’t play in that game. The state should be running this whole project.”

Knowing that DOT will be coming back in months with a potentially different estimate relieved County Council of having to make a decision soon, but the county has been asked to commit within six months to moving forward with continuing work at a cost of $75 million.

“The need for the project is obvious,” said Hall, citing the area’s rapid population growth.

She said the county’s ongoing plans to spend more than $200 million on traffic improvements along Main Road on Johns Island, and at the U.S. Highway 17 intersection, will help but won’t be enough.

The road project has the support of Charleston business and real estate groups, the City of Charleston, and the county. It’s opposed by conservation and wildlife groups, and residents have been divided.

Councilman Brantley Moody, who supports the Mark Clark Extension, blamed the rising costs on delays caused by opponents of the project. According to Mattox’s presentation, delays have added $112 million to the cost estimate.

Hall said DOT has concluded that the project is so large that it should be done in two phases, starting with extending the road from West Ashley across Johns Island. That’s meant to ensure that the job’s not too big, in order to get competitive bids if the project reaches that point.

Council Chairman Teddie Pryor said that when DOT comes back with the refined cost estimates in several months “then council can dive into this and figure out what to do.”

Cost to extend I-526 to James Island more than triples to $2.35 billion

The price tag for the long-planned extension of the Mark Clark Expressway from West Ashley across Johns Island to James Island has suddenly tripled.The S.C. Department of Transportation’s new construction estimate is a whopping $2.35 billion — or more than three times the projected cost when it was last calculated in 2015.The impact on Charleston County would be dramatic and those in charge have expressed concern the future of the road plan is in doubt.“I don’t know if people are going to have an ...

The price tag for the long-planned extension of the Mark Clark Expressway from West Ashley across Johns Island to James Island has suddenly tripled.

The S.C. Department of Transportation’s new construction estimate is a whopping $2.35 billion — or more than three times the projected cost when it was last calculated in 2015.

The impact on Charleston County would be dramatic and those in charge have expressed concern the future of the road plan is in doubt.

“I don’t know if people are going to have an appetite for it,” said Council Chairman Teddie Pryor. “Where are we going to get the extra money from?”

With the state’s share of the cost capped at $420 million, Charleston County had expected to contribute about $305 million to the project under the previous $725 million estimate.

Now, the county’s share would be more than $1.9 billion.

“We’ll wait to see how the county responds,” said state Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall. “Our recommendation remains ... to proceed with preliminary activity on the project and get to the point where it would be shovel-ready.”

In a letter to the county April 25, Hall said DOT is asking the county and the state Transportation Infrastructure Bank Board for approval to spend $150 million for ongoing work to make the road plan ready for bids. The county would pay half that amount.

Beyond that, the highway department wants to county to demonstrate “a reasonable financial approach to the entire project.”

Pryor said the County Council will discuss the issue when it meets at a regularly scheduled meeting at 5 p.m. today, April 26. He said the county would likely need federal assistance, new taxes, or both, in order to fund such a project.

The county and the state have each spent about $12.5 million on the project so far, he said.

“The longer this thing is delayed, the more it’s going to cost,” said Pryor.

Hall said one reason the cost has gone up so much is the soaring price of real estate in Charleston County. Acquiring the land needed for the road would cost an estimated $261 million, she said.

The DOT estimate assumes construction could begin in 2028, and also assumes there would be two or three years of litigation before that.

If completed, there would be a highway loop around Charleston, with the interstate running from Mount Pleasant across Daniel Island, North Charleston and West Ashley, then becoming more of a parkway across Johns Island and connecting to the James Island Connector on James Island.

This is a developing story and will be updated.

Thursday headlines: S.C. House kills medical marijuana bill

S.C. House Speaker Pro Tem Tommy Pope, R-Rock Hill, shot down a medical marijuana bill by S.C. Sen. Tom Davis, R-Beaufort, by ruling a 6% fee on medical marijuana sales creates a new tax. That power only is allowed under the state constitution by a bill that originates in the House, according to this story. The bill originated in the state Senate, where Davis has been fighting to pass the ...

S.C. House Speaker Pro Tem Tommy Pope, R-Rock Hill, shot down a medical marijuana bill by S.C. Sen. Tom Davis, R-Beaufort, by ruling a 6% fee on medical marijuana sales creates a new tax. That power only is allowed under the state constitution by a bill that originates in the House, according to this story. The bill originated in the state Senate, where Davis has been fighting to pass the compassionate care bill for seven years.

In other South Carolina news:

Crowd rallies for pro-choice in downtown Charleston. In light of the U.S. Supreme Court’s leaked draft opinion on overturning the landmark Roe v. Wade abortion case, at least 200 advocates, including Planned Parenthood and Charleston Black Lives Matters representatives, rallied in downtown Charleston Wednesday night.

Former bank CEO indicted in Murdaugh case. Former Palmetto State Bank CEO Russell Laffitte was accused of 21 charges by the State Grand Jury Wednesday related to disgraced attorney Alex Murdaugh. Lafitte was indicted for conspiring to steal roughly hundreds of thousands of dollars in settlement proceeds owed to the family of a deaf man who was left severely disabled after a 2009 car accident. The indictments come four months after the bank ousted him as CEO for his involvement with Murdaugh.

Airbnb to filter partygoers in Charleston for Memorial Day. Airbnb said it planned to prevent parties in Airbnb renter’s homes on Memorial Weekend in Charleston by restricting one- to two-day rentals being made by users with bad reviews.

Charleston nonprofit working to unearth sunken vessel. A group of young professionals is partnering with nonprofit group Wounded Nature Working Veterans to retrieve a sunken vessel in the Charleston harbor. The vessel, the group says, causes damage to the area near the James Island Connector and makes it dangerous for boaters sailing in and out. The two groups are looking to raise $15,000 to help retrieve the boat.

Lowcountry wedding industry back in full swing. The Wedding Report predicts nearly 2.5 million U.S. weddings in 2022, the highest number since 1984. Local businesses like Taylor Jordan Photography and Patrick Properties Hospitality Group have seen an increase in business after two years of the pandemic. Officials say weddings in North Charleston make a positive impact to the city, as the national average cost of a wedding is $32,000.

Carolina Squat vehicle modification is one step closer to being banned. The S.C. House unanimously voted on Wednesday to ban vehicle modifications like the “Carolina Squat,” a modification in which the front end of a truck or SUV being placed higher than the back end, from roadways. If the bill becomes law, vehicles will be prohibited from raising four or more inches above the height of the rear fender.

To get dozens of South Carolina news stories every business day, contact the folks at SC Clips.

Help the City Paper keep delivering excellence

Winner of top 2021 state journalism honors (best editorial writing and best cartoon), the Charleston City Paper brings you the Best of Charleston every day. Support our “unafraid” journalism with a one-time donation or become a member of the City Paper Club.

Physical Education Grad Overcomes Hardships to Earn Degree

As the Class of 2022 prepares for Commencement, May 6–7, The College Today will highlight how some of our graduating seniors spent their time at CofC, and what the future holds.Pierre “PJ” Edwards II doesn’t recall ever having an African American male teacher. A native of Charleston, South Carolina, Edwards grew up on James Island where he attended public K-12 schools.“I was one of those kids on the outskirts,” says Edwards. “There weren’t very m...

As the Class of 2022 prepares for Commencement, May 6–7, The College Today will highlight how some of our graduating seniors spent their time at CofC, and what the future holds.

Pierre “PJ” Edwards II doesn’t recall ever having an African American male teacher. A native of Charleston, South Carolina, Edwards grew up on James Island where he attended public K-12 schools.

“I was one of those kids on the outskirts,” says Edwards. “There weren’t very many people who looked like me at school.”

That’s part of what makes the Call Me MISTER (Mentors Instructing Students Toward Effective Role models) program essential for future educators like Edwards, who will graduate from the College of Charleston on Saturday, May 7, 2022, with a degree in physical education. The goal of the Call Me MISTER program is to increase the pool of male teachers from diverse backgrounds, particularly African American male teachers.

“The MISTERS program literally means everything to me,” says Edwards, whose first taste of teaching came in high school when he worked for the Charleston County School District’s after school program and saw firsthand the need for more African American male teachers. “It’s a brotherhood of like-minded individuals who share the same passion and, although some of us come from different walks of life, our passions and goals are the same.”

And a passion for teaching runs in his family: Edward’s older sister Sharmaine Roaden ’11 is a Spanish teacher and inspired him to follow her path from CofC to the classroom.

Edwards will be the first to tell you that his journey through college was a long time coming. He wasn’t a traditional college student when he came to the College in 2013. With a goal of staying debt free, he commuted 30 minutes to campus to attend classes full time, while also juggling four jobs.

“In 2017 I became mentally and physically exhausted to the point that I could no longer keep up,” says Edwards, who had to take a three-year break before resuming classes in 2020. “I use my story to inspire others to persevere, lean into those who truly support them and remember that it’s not how you start, it’s how you finish. I advocate for male educators to be unapologetically authentic with themselves and to the young lives they’ll impact – to change the narrative and societal perspective about us and lastly to not let passion be mistaken for arrogance.”

Edwards says he would not have made it to the finish line at the College if it hadn’t been for the professors who offered him “100% support.” A few of these important educators include the late Floyd Breeland, former director of the College’s Call Me MISTER program and South Carolina state representative; Rénard Harris, vice president of access and inclusion and chief diversity officer at CofC; Karen Smail, associate professor of health and human performance; and Anthony James ’12 (M.A.T.), CofC’s director of minority education and outreach and the Call Me MISTER program. Edwards is also grateful to have received the Constantina P. Padgett Education Scholarship and a scholarship through a grant from Dominion Energy, both of which have helped enable him to fulfill his goal of graduating debt free.

“Pierre’s story is one of determination and perseverance,” says James. “After some personal hardships that impacted his academics, he left the College. He returned after a three-year hiatus, and the moment he stepped on campus, he assumed the role of mentor and leader for many of the younger MISTERs. He shared the stories of his hardship and what he had to do to overcome them. Despite struggling during his first stint at the College, Pierre returned and excelled academically. He had a 3.7 GPA his first year back. He often shares that his passion for educating children is his strongest motivator. I’m so proud of Pierre, and I know he will be a fantastic physical education teacher.”

After graduation Edwards hopes to use the skills he’s learned to advocate for the physical and emotional well-being of young males from diverse backgrounds. As a basketball coach at St. Johns High School, a rural island school located about 30 minutes from the CofC campus, he has found that “whether it’s paddle boarding or pickle ball, there’s a form of fitness for everyone. This is the best time in their lives to establish healthy habits, which – in turn – gives kids a boost in self-confidence.”

This fall he’ll put all that he has learned to use in his first official teaching job at Charleston Charter School for Math and Science. Smail says Edwards’ future students should count themselves lucky.

“Pierre is an inspiration and role model whose presence in the classroom transforms the experience for all students,” she says. “Pierre embodies the expression ‘life-long learner’ as he strives to instill in each of his students the passion for movement. Pierre is the teacher you want your child to have.”

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