Auto body shopin Johns Island, SC

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The Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration Difference

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

One of the unfortunate realities about driving and owning cars in the Lowcountry is that you will probably have to deal with some form of body damage at some point. Whether your driver-side door gets dinged in a parking lot or you back into a light pole, accidents happen. The good news? Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration is here to help with all of your body shop needs.

Unlike many fly-by-night collision repair companies, our auto body shop in cityname, state has served hardworking people for years. We make it a point to only employ the most experienced, highly-trained auto body technicians available, so you have peace of mind that we'll get the job done right. In fact, our mechanics have more than 60 years of combined experience. There is no collision repair job that we haven't handled - from minor bumps and scratches to complex repairs stemming from multi-car accidents.

At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we are committed to providing our customers with the highest-quality body shop services at the most reasonable prices in town. We believe that everyone deserves to have their car or truck repaired when they need it the most. After all, our vehicles are crucial to daily life. We need them to live, work and play. We use them for just about every activity we enjoy, from taking the kids to soccer practice to hitting the gym on a Saturday morning. That's why we work with just about every car insurance company out there to ensure that our loyal customers have access to the best collision repair in South Carolina.

Customers choose Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration because they know we strive to exceed their expectations. At the end of the day, we want to do right by our customers with reliable body shop services, high-quality repair work, and helpful customer service. But that's not all. Our clients enjoy peace of mind with their collision repairs because we:

auto body shop Services

SERVICE AREAS

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Provide Free Estimates: Drop by our shop or call our office to learn more about our free estimates. Once we understand the scope of your restoration needs, our team will get to work.

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Offer 100% Guarantee: We have become a staple in our community because we guarantee our work 100%. If we missed the mark, made a mistake, or you're unhappy with our service, let us know. We'll make it right.

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Specialize in Full-Service Repairs: Our collision mechanics make repairs on all vehicle makes and models, so you don't have to worry about whether we can service your car. As a full-service collision repair company in South Carolina, we help every step of the way, from the moment we meet until you leave our parking lot.

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Love to Paint: Yes, you read that right. At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we have a team of incredibly talented car painters to supplement our collision services. We offer various auto painting services, from minor paint jobs to full-scale custom paint projects.

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Accept Car Insurance: As daily drivers and locals in South Carolina, we know that collision repairs can be pricey. Despite the cost, they are necessary for daily life. That's why we're happy to work with car insurance companies, so you can go where you need to go without stressing about safety.

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Work Hard for You: At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we try to keep it simple. You can rest easy knowing that there's no fine print, sleazy sales tactics, or lazy mechanics to worry about. When you pull into our parking lot, know that we prioritize good old-fashioned hard work and reliable service. No if's, and's, or but's.

Your First Choice for Collision
Repair in Johns Island, SC

According to recent statistics from the South Carolina Department of Public Safety, a new traffic accident happens every 3.7 minutes in South Carolina. That's a lot of car accidents in a short amount of time. Being involved in a car accident can be a traumatic experience, filled with complex insurance claims and complicated auto body repairs. At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we know how stressful it can be to have your care restored to its pre-collision beauty. That's why we offer comprehensive, streamlined auto body services and unsurpassed car restoration quality.

With more than 60 years of combined body shop experience in South Carolina, our repair techs leave no stones unturned and never take shortcuts when repairing your vehicle. We're proud to say we only use the latest diagnostic techniques, equipment, and parts to get the job done right. That way, you can get back on the road quickly and safely.

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

A few of our most common auto body shop services include but are not limited to:

Frame Repair in Johns Island

Studies show that about 50 percent of vehicles suffer some kind of frame damage in a car collision. Frame damage can occur easily, even in common situations involving minor fender benders. Often, frame damage is difficult to see and can go unnoticed by insurance adjusters. The unfortunate truth is that even minor frame damage can put you, your family, your friends, and your car at risk when driving. When it goes unnoticed, it can often spell disaster for everyday drivers who might think their car is fine to drive.

When your car's frame is bent, your alignment is usually off, too, causing you to swerve and veer while driving. At best, this scenario results in unnecessary wear on your tires and, at worst, results in a car wreck. The bottom line? You need to get your car's frame inspected by a team of professional collision repair experts, even if you've only been involved in a minor accident.

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we take a comprehensive approach to frame repair and alignment. Our highly-trained frame repair technicians use a multi-point process to diagnose and correct your frame problems by:

  • Inspecting your car and its frame visually to discover any denting or bending.
  • Our alignment machine uses hydraulics and torque to strengthen your car's frame back to factory specs.
  • If our technicians spot damage, we'll begin the restoration process by placing your car on our frame alignment machine.
  • Once your frame is fixed, we'll answer any of your questions and will send you back on the road with a safe-to-drive vehicle.

Your First Choice for Collision Repair in Johns Island, SC

Chips and cracks are bad news for your car's windshield and don't just look bad - they can do serious damage when left unrepaired. Cracks and chips can quickly turn from a minor inconvenience to a safety hazard by impairing your vision. If your windshield crack is bad enough, you might even get pulled over by a police officer. Driving your vehicle with a large crack or even with an object embedded in it is a bad idea, but Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration is here to help.

Our windshield repair technicians have years of experience repairing car windows and windshields for many types of automobile glass, including side and rear windows. If you have been involved in a collision and need new glass, we can help facilitate that process and install a new windshield without you ever lifting a finger. New glass is usually needed with serious car wrecks, and it's always best to trust a professional auto body shop in cityname, state to get the job done. Our team uses the most modern glass and adhesives on the market, so you know your windshield and windows are high-quality and ready for the road.

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

Whether you have a chipped windshield or need all-new glass for your car, we're here to serve you.
Out car windshield and glass repairs include:

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

Door Glass

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

Vent Glass

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

Quarter Glass

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

Back Glass

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

Windshield Glass

Paintless Dent Removal in Johns Island

Any kind of item or stray piece of debris can dent your car. If you've been driving for at least a few years, chances are you've parked at a grocery store and, after shopping, returned to your car to see a big, unsightly dent. Whether they're due to inclement weather or rocks on the highway, dents cause noticeable damage that only gets worse with time. One of the most common dent repair solutions is paintless dent removal - a process that removes dents in your vehicle without removing any paint.

Paintless dent removal is great because it is not invasive and is a very efficient, cost-effective way to fix car dents before they get even worse. There are no fillers or sanding involved, making this option one of the quickest ways to remove dents. At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, our dent removal technicians use several tools to gently massage dents out of your car. When we're done, we'll smooth everything back into place, leaving your car looking like new.

To make matters even better, most paintless dent removal is supported by car insurance agencies, meaning you may not pay a cent out of pocket for our dent removal services.

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

Classic Car Restoration
in Johns Island

At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we are very passionate about classic car restoration and offer a wide range of restoration services in Johns Island. We understand that no two classic car restoration projects are the same, which is why we offer a wide variety of services. We're talking mechanical upgrades, partial restorations, and full car restoration projects. If you have a repair, upgrade, or restoration plan in mind, chances are we can help you achieve your goals.

After we perform an initial inspection and provide you with a detailed estimate on the scope of work needed to restore your car, our seasoned technicians will get to work on your project.

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

Our full-scale classic car restoration process includes:

Auto Body Work Overhaul

Painting

Mechanical Repairs

Repair Interior

Custom Auto Body Painting in Johns Island

When was the last time you got compliments on your car's paint? If you loved your car's paint when it was brand new but hate what it looks like now, Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration can help you fall back in love with your vehicle. Whether your current paint job looks old and faded or you're craving a new color to show off, our paint technicians can deliver what you're looking for.

Between our advanced painting tools and uber-talented vehicle painting experts, our team can transform your car's aesthetic appeal, no matter the make and model. We can even fix dings and scratches in your paint while we're at it, so your car is shiny, smooth, and ready to turn heads.

We offer various auto painting services, from minor paint jobs to full-scale custom projects. We're happy to work with budgets of all sizes and can accommodate all of your painting needs, whether you want to paint a daily driver or a show car.

We recommend you call our office today, so we can get to know you a little better and understand what kind of paint job your car needs. We're happy to chat about cars and your paint job, even if you're just inquiring. After all, we're more than the best body shop in Johns Island - we're enthusiasts, too.

Auto Body Shop Johns Island, SC

Your First Choice for Collison
Repair in Johns Island, SC

If you're on the hunt for the highest-quality auto body repair services in South Carolina, backed by decades of experience, look no further than Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration. We put our customer's needs first and strive to exceed expectations with every service we offer - all at a price you can afford. Swing by our body shop or contact our office today to discover why we're the Lowcountry's first choice in collision repair.

Troop-Films-LLC-phone-number(843) 996-4995

Free Estimates

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Johns Island neighbors are organizing against potential hurricane debris burn site

JOHNS ISLAND — As Charleston County decides whether to buy 95 acres on this sea island to manage hurricane wreckage, nearby residents are speaking out against the move.Several people showed up to the Feb. 1 County Council meeting, urging the panel not to allow burning and dirt mining on the parcels. They cited concerns about air quality from smoke and trucks running up and down Johns Island’s already clogged roads. Some have organized a planned meeting for concerned neighbors on Feb. 5, when they will convene to discuss th...

JOHNS ISLAND — As Charleston County decides whether to buy 95 acres on this sea island to manage hurricane wreckage, nearby residents are speaking out against the move.

Several people showed up to the Feb. 1 County Council meeting, urging the panel not to allow burning and dirt mining on the parcels. They cited concerns about air quality from smoke and trucks running up and down Johns Island’s already clogged roads. Some have organized a planned meeting for concerned neighbors on Feb. 5, when they will convene to discuss the matter further.

“It just feels like another punch in the gut as a Johns Island resident, to be honest with you,” Becca Nexsen, who lives near the site, told The Post and Courier. “We have unbridled development, there’s so little infrastructure … we’re Charleston County’s dumping ground. Of course we’re going to get this.”

The proposal to buy three tracts of farmland between Humbert Road and Main Road, known locally as Grayson Oaks, first came before County Council in a committee meeting in late January. Eric Adams, the county’s deputy director for public works, told The Post and Courier the site could be used to burn fallen tree limbs and vegetation after a major storm, to turn this material into wood chips, or as a possible dirt mine.

One of the reasons the land is attractive to the county is because of an infestation of invasive Asian longhorned beetles. A large swath of southern Charleston County is inside a beetle quarantine area, and wood cannot legally be removed without being processed or shredded into small pieces first. The Grayson Oaks land is inside that boundary, and thus, could handle debris inside of it too.

But Ted Cadmus, who lives in the Gift Plantation neighborhood less than a mile away, said the smoke would be a nuisance to local property values, and that additional trucks to and from the site would stress already-packed roads.

“I kind of don’t care if it is infrequent or frequent as far as the burning is concerned,” Cadmus said. Even if the county uses special burning methods to lessen smoke, he said, “the same pollutants are going to be thrown off.”

Cadmus also worried about ash from the fire polluting groundwater, and thus, wells in the area around it. One of the speakers at the County Council meeting also said he and others off Humbert Road use well water and could be affected.

Patricia Fair, a researcher who has spent decades studying environmental contamination, spoke at the council meeting and wrote them a letter describing the potential health effects of wood smoke. Fair, who also lives in Gift Plantation and works as adjunct faculty for the Medical University of South Carolina, wrote that the fine particulate matter in smoke, or soot, can cause a bevy of health effects.

“These microscopic particles can get into your eyes and respiratory system, where they may cause burning eyes, runny nose, and illnesses, such as bronchitis,” Fair wrote. “Fine particles can make asthma symptoms worse and trigger asthma attacks. Fine particles can also trigger heart attacks, stroke, irregular heart rhythms, and heart failure, especially in people who are already at risk for these conditions.”

Council members appeared split on the issue at their Feb. 1 meeting, with some expressing concern over potential nuisances from the site, and others saying that this kind of hurricane cleanup work was simply not optional and needed a reliable location.

“If there’s a valid need and there’s property, we’ve got to try and figure out a way to make it work,” Councilman Brantley Moody said. “We’ve got to find places to do this (type of work) that are other than just stick it in North Charleston.”

But Councilwoman Anna Johnson, who represents Johns Island, said the additional traffic strain on Main Road wouldn’t work, and the St. Johns Fire District is already stretched thin by residents’ reports of smoke from rural burning elsewhere on the island.

She questioned whether the county is considering the land “because it’s available to be purchased, or because we need some place to burn, or we need a (dirt) pit?”

Ultimately, County Council tabled the issue for a month.

But residents will continue to organize in the meantime. A meeting has been set for 9 a.m. on Feb. 5, in the parking lot of Berkeley Electric Cooperative at 1135 Main Road.

Wild Georgia: A birding moment can inspire a lifetime conservation ethic

I was age 7, growing up on Johns Island, South Carolina, when a ruby-throated hummingbird showed up in our yard on a spring day and began flitting amongst the blooms in my mother’s garden.For several minutes, I watched in fascination as the tiny bird zipped from flower to flower. It kept coming back over the next several days and I developed an attachment to it — as if it were returning just for me. From then on, I was a devoted bird lover. Now, some 70 years later, I have learned this lesson: Even seemingly everyday momen...

I was age 7, growing up on Johns Island, South Carolina, when a ruby-throated hummingbird showed up in our yard on a spring day and began flitting amongst the blooms in my mother’s garden.

For several minutes, I watched in fascination as the tiny bird zipped from flower to flower. It kept coming back over the next several days and I developed an attachment to it — as if it were returning just for me. From then on, I was a devoted bird lover. Now, some 70 years later, I have learned this lesson: Even seemingly everyday moments in nature can inspire a youngster to a lifelong commitment to conservation.

I tell this because four young neighbors on my street in Decatur have become hooked on birds — Ella Ballard, 11; Eden Ballard, 9; Declan Pease, 8; and Elias Parga-Tang, 7. Calling themselves Lil Birdie Rascals, they teamed up to compete in this year’s annual Youth Birding Competition (YBC) administered by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

In the event, birding teams of four youngsters each vie statewide by age group to find the highest number of birds within 24 hours — without help from the adults chaperoning them. The Lil Birdie Rascals tallied 33 species in or near our neighborhood, earning them the award for Top Rookie Team in the Elementary Division. They also received the Top Fundraising award for raising $735 to expand bird habitat at a neighborhood church.

Their 24-hour count started on my backyard deck overlooking woods along Burnt Fork Creek. They were thrilled right off when a red-shouldered hawk landed in the creek to take a bath, which Elias said was his favorite part of the count. Eden said her favorite part was seeing all of the biodiversity around a lake, including fish and turtles; Declan’s favorite was a close-up view of a mallard mother with two ducklings. For Ella, it was the total of 33 species — when her team’s goal was 25.

As Tim Keyes, the DNR’s coordinator for the YBC, noted: “This event always gives me great hope for the future of birding and conservation.”

IN THE SKY: From David Dundee, Tellus Science Museum astronomer: The Eta Aquarid meteor shower peaks this weekend at about 60 meteors per hour in the eastern sky. The moon will be first quarter on Sunday. Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn (rising around midnight) are all low in the east a few hours before sunrise.

5 SC woodworkers who make unusual products, from joggling boards to hand-carved tables

Custom woodworking doesn’t always mean tables.And South Carolina craftsmen have come up with some doozies. Sure, they can make tables, bed frames and chairs, but not everyone can make canoe paddles so pretty you’d want to hang it on your wall. Or baseball bats and rolling pins. How about a boggle board?Here are five South Carolina woodworkers who offer more than a beautiful table or tables with a twist.James Herndon has always been fascinated with boats. He made his first of plywood when he was 12 years old....

Custom woodworking doesn’t always mean tables.

And South Carolina craftsmen have come up with some doozies. Sure, they can make tables, bed frames and chairs, but not everyone can make canoe paddles so pretty you’d want to hang it on your wall. Or baseball bats and rolling pins. How about a boggle board?

Here are five South Carolina woodworkers who offer more than a beautiful table or tables with a twist.

James Herndon has always been fascinated with boats. He made his first of plywood when he was 12 years old.

“They didn’t look very nice,” he said.

What does look nice are the paddles for canoes and stand-up paddle boards he makes when he’s not working his steady job as an automobile collision repairman.

He has made them for about 15 years of exotic hardwoods like bloodwood, red wood, maple and mahogany.

They range in price from $420 to $1,100.

If people recoil at the price — you can buy a standard paddle for $15 at Cabela’s — he just casually suggests they try to make one themselves.

“They get real quiet,” he said.

His stepson never finished the one he started.

And no one ever thought to take a Cabela’s paddle and hang it on the wall as they do with Herndon’s creations.

Capers Landrum Cauthen does make tables, but what’s so special about them is just about every one is made from reclaimed wood. Wood from century-old Charleston homes and businesses. Trees downed by hurricanes.

Not too long ago, he took the wood from the Charleston Visitors Center when the building was remodeled. Huge timbers that he used to make benches and tables for, you guessed it, furnishings for the center.

Cauthen’s father was the longtime director of the Historic Preservation Society of Charleston and the first professional curator of historic properties in Columbia, including the Hampton-Preston House and the Robert Mills House and was the designer of the Boyleston Gardens, separating the Lace House and the Boyleston House, now a part of the Governor’s Mansion complex.

His grandfather was an editor at The State and the Columbia Record, credited with coining the term Midlands, Cauthen said.

Capers Cauthen did home renovations initially. Then in 1989, Hurricane Hugo blew through the Lowcountry.

“It opened my eyes,” he said.

Now, Cauthen has pallets and pallets of reclaimed wood in his storage facility. And he claims to be able to find any specific species he needs for a project.

Tim Martin, a high school baseball player, decided to make his own bat. Then he made one for every member of the team. Now at 24, he’s making rolling pins for television renovator Joanna Gaines’s Magnolia Shop and tables, desks and beds for a Charleston interior designer.

He makes cutting boards. He made a 10-foot-long table from teak. Doors, signs. A huge frame from a split tree — hence the business name — for a man who wanted to frame a very large flag, all by hand.

Operating from his garage, Martin relies on help from his parents and siblings to run the business.

His mother, Tina, says her son’s success is as much about attitude as it is about talent. He doesn’t say no. If someone asks for something he’s not made before he simply says he’ll try.

Perry Gervais spent a career as an executive of a company that made asphalt shingles. It was OK, but when the company sold, Gervais decided he wanted to do something where he could see a project through to the end.

Woodworking fit the bill. His home place is along the Stono River in John’s Island — hence the name. His mother had wanted a joggling board for her porch for sometime. It was a hit. Other people wanted one.

Then he moved on to other products. Each one handcrafted. He makes sea chests, toolboxes, tables, benches and stools. And one of the more creative items is a rocking boat — like a rocking horse but a boat.

And he makes real boats — skiffs, for shrimping, fishing and, as he says it, playing in the creeks and rivers as he did as a boy and continues to do as a man.

“When I’m working I lose track of time,” he said. “It’s just a labor of love.”

Josh Cox learned woodworking as a child in his grandfather’s warehouse on Bricker Hill in Salem, Ohio. Now, he makes handcrafted tables and consoles that he ships around the world, to Australia and all across the United States.

His great-grandfather was a master woodworker as well.

Cox started Bricker & Beam about eight years ago and gets the word out about his work through social media, etsy and direct search on his website. He also works with interior designers.

For a time he had a spin-off business, Bricker & Bark, to make custom dog beds that often went to customers in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco, making the shipping cost about half the price of the piece.

He said he’ll still make a dog bed if someone wants one, but that business is largely dormant.

Cox said he most enjoys making Mobley cabinets because he hand carves the fronts, using a special tool similar to something a metalworker would use.

“Woodworking is therapeutic,” he said. And at the end of a day, you have something to show for it.

On a personal note, Cox said he is getting ready to build a house on some land in Blythewood. He will make the cabinets from some white oak and cherry his grandfather has had for 20 years, when he hired Amish workers to thin trees on his property.

Cox was about 7 years old then. It was the moment he made the connection between trees, lumber and home products, setting the stage for Bricker & Beam.

South Carolina says cost to finish I-526 in Charleston triples to $2.3B

The project's supporters suggest prices may soon fall, reducing the cost of I-526.CHARLESTON, S.C. — South Carolina's road agency says the cost to build a long-debated completion of the Interstate 526 loop has tripled to more than $2.3 billion because of rising costs of land and construction.The state's share of the Mark C...

The project's supporters suggest prices may soon fall, reducing the cost of I-526.

CHARLESTON, S.C. — South Carolina's road agency says the cost to build a long-debated completion of the Interstate 526 loop has tripled to more than $2.3 billion because of rising costs of land and construction.

The state's share of the Mark Clark Extension is capped at $420 million in a 2019 agreement with the Charleston County, meaning the county would need to find nearly $2 billion to complete the project — six times more than it planned.

The highway would start at the west end of I-526 in West Ashley, cross on to Johns Island and run back off the island to James Island. It would end at the James Island Connector.

“This, to me, is a perfect opportunity for Charleston County Council to walk away from this project,” Jason Crowley of the Coastal Conservation League told The Post and Courier of Charleston.

The league has fought the new highway for years, saying it would benefit few people and harm many.

A large portion of the project would go through Charleston. Mayor John Tecklenburg said the I-526 extension is vital.

"Our West Ashley and island residents need and deserve the traffic relief and public safety improvements this project will bring,” Tecklenburg said in statement.

The I-526 extension is separate from another project to widen the mostly four-lane interstate that links Mount Pleasant to the state port, Interstate 26 and West Ashley. The freeway has been busy because of the Charleston area's growth.

State officials said it could cost around $7 billion to expand I-526 to eight lanes, untangle its intersection with I-26 and build or expand several bridges along the route.

For the I-526 extension, the South Carolina Department of Transportation is asking Charleston County to show it still wants to fund the project, estimating the county would need to pay about $75 million to get ready for bids.

“I don’t know if people are going to have an appetite for it,” said County Council Chair Teddie Pryor. “Where are we going to get the extra money from?”

The project's supporters suggest prices may soon fall, reducing the cost of I-526. Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce said, though, that further delays show costs inevitably rise.

“The current cost of the project heightens the important need of completing this effort now," the chamber said.

Johns Island conservation easement would protect flood-prone area from development

A 94-acre property on Johns Island that was once the site of a proposed 240-home community may be protected from all future development.Charleston City Council on April 12 approved allocating about $515,000 of its greenbelt funding toward a conservation easement for the property, known as the Oakville Tract.Greenbelt funding is set aside by Charleston County to various municipalities in the county for conservation projects. The Lowcountry Land Trust is drafting the agreement to protect the property and matching the city’s...

A 94-acre property on Johns Island that was once the site of a proposed 240-home community may be protected from all future development.

Charleston City Council on April 12 approved allocating about $515,000 of its greenbelt funding toward a conservation easement for the property, known as the Oakville Tract.

Greenbelt funding is set aside by Charleston County to various municipalities in the county for conservation projects. The Lowcountry Land Trust is drafting the agreement to protect the property and matching the city’s allocation using funds from a grant awarded through the state of South Carolina.

“You wouldn’t want to be developing this site, it’s very low, it’s subject to flooding and it can have an impact on the overall drainage basin,” Mayor John Tecklenburg said during a Charleston City Council Real Estate Committee meeting April 11.

The Charleston Aviation Authority bought two parcels of land in August, including the Oakville tract, to prevent homes from sprouting on the edge of the 1,333-acre Charleston Executive Airport next to the Stono River.

The purchases will allow the airport to widen and extend one of its runways and use the Oakville tract as an undeveloped “clear zone” or safety buffer for the runway. The most that the Aviation Authority could build on the Oakville tract under the proposed conservation easement would be a road connecting different areas of the airport to each other, said City Councilman Karl Brady who represents the area.

“I think its a huge win because the airport gets a buffer zone and we’re able to save that low-lying land,” Brady said.

The 94-acre Oakville tract is mostly located in the city of Charleston but is partially within the county. It is also located entirely within the urban growth boundary, an area where higher density of development is allowed on Johns Island. The low-lying piece of land is also on Burden Creek. Preserving it from development will allow runoff to continue downstream rather than be blocked by homes, roads and businesses.

“There would have been a lot of repercussion upstream,” said Johns Island Taskforce Chairman John Zlogar of the previous proposal to build homes on the property. The task force was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

The Charleston Aviation Authority bought the Oakville tract and another 43-acre tract for $7.7 million. Out of that, $4.9 million went to the developers of the proposed community on the Oakville tract for the estimated development rights of the land. If the use of the city of Charleston’s allocation of greenbelt funds is given final approval by Charleston County, the Aviation Authority has agreed to donate $3.9 million worth of those development rights, said Natalie Olson, Sea Islands Program Director for the Lowcountry Land Trust.

The grant funds would reimburse the Aviation Authority for about $1 million worth of those land rights. The agency will retain ownership of the property, but the conservation easement will limit all development on it in perpetuity.

City Councilman Ross Appel told members of the Real Estate Committee that it is common for airports to create “buffer zones” along the edges of their properties.

“These airports are economic engines and there is going to be a lot of desire to develop in and around this area,” Appel said.

Charleston County Council’s Finance Committee will vote April 21 whether to approve the city’s allocation of its share of greenbelt funds to the conservation easement. The proposal will then need a final vote from County Council.

The Oakville property is one of several tracts of land on Johns Island that are being considered for greenbelt funds. County Council’s Finance Committee will also consider approving greenbelt funds to place conservation easements on two large properties, a 700-acre tract along the Stono River known as Ravenswood and a 35-acre tract that once included the Sea Islands Farmers Cooperative. The co-op was founded by Black farmers in the 1970s.

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