Auto body shopin Kiawah Island, SC

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The Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration Difference

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

One of the unfortunate realities about driving and owning cars in the Lowcountry is that you will probably have to deal with some form of body damage at some point. Whether your driver-side door gets dinged in a parking lot or you back into a light pole, accidents happen. The good news? Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration is here to help with all of your body shop needs.

Unlike many fly-by-night collision repair companies, our auto body shop in cityname, state has served hardworking people for years. We make it a point to only employ the most experienced, highly-trained auto body technicians available, so you have peace of mind that we'll get the job done right. In fact, our mechanics have more than 60 years of combined experience. There is no collision repair job that we haven't handled - from minor bumps and scratches to complex repairs stemming from multi-car accidents.

At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we are committed to providing our customers with the highest-quality body shop services at the most reasonable prices in town. We believe that everyone deserves to have their car or truck repaired when they need it the most. After all, our vehicles are crucial to daily life. We need them to live, work and play. We use them for just about every activity we enjoy, from taking the kids to soccer practice to hitting the gym on a Saturday morning. That's why we work with just about every car insurance company out there to ensure that our loyal customers have access to the best collision repair in South Carolina.

Customers choose Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration because they know we strive to exceed their expectations. At the end of the day, we want to do right by our customers with reliable body shop services, high-quality repair work, and helpful customer service. But that's not all. Our clients enjoy peace of mind with their collision repairs because we:

auto body shop Services

SERVICE AREAS

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Provide Free Estimates: Drop by our shop or call our office to learn more about our free estimates. Once we understand the scope of your restoration needs, our team will get to work.

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Offer 100% Guarantee: We have become a staple in our community because we guarantee our work 100%. If we missed the mark, made a mistake, or you're unhappy with our service, let us know. We'll make it right.

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Specialize in Full-Service Repairs: Our collision mechanics make repairs on all vehicle makes and models, so you don't have to worry about whether we can service your car. As a full-service collision repair company in South Carolina, we help every step of the way, from the moment we meet until you leave our parking lot.

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Love to Paint: Yes, you read that right. At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we have a team of incredibly talented car painters to supplement our collision services. We offer various auto painting services, from minor paint jobs to full-scale custom paint projects.

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Accept Car Insurance: As daily drivers and locals in South Carolina, we know that collision repairs can be pricey. Despite the cost, they are necessary for daily life. That's why we're happy to work with car insurance companies, so you can go where you need to go without stressing about safety.

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Work Hard for You: At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we try to keep it simple. You can rest easy knowing that there's no fine print, sleazy sales tactics, or lazy mechanics to worry about. When you pull into our parking lot, know that we prioritize good old-fashioned hard work and reliable service. No if's, and's, or but's.

Your First Choice for Collision
Repair in Kiawah Island, SC

According to recent statistics from the South Carolina Department of Public Safety, a new traffic accident happens every 3.7 minutes in South Carolina. That's a lot of car accidents in a short amount of time. Being involved in a car accident can be a traumatic experience, filled with complex insurance claims and complicated auto body repairs. At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we know how stressful it can be to have your care restored to its pre-collision beauty. That's why we offer comprehensive, streamlined auto body services and unsurpassed car restoration quality.

With more than 60 years of combined body shop experience in South Carolina, our repair techs leave no stones unturned and never take shortcuts when repairing your vehicle. We're proud to say we only use the latest diagnostic techniques, equipment, and parts to get the job done right. That way, you can get back on the road quickly and safely.

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

A few of our most common auto body shop services include but are not limited to:

Frame Repair in Kiawah Island

Studies show that about 50 percent of vehicles suffer some kind of frame damage in a car collision. Frame damage can occur easily, even in common situations involving minor fender benders. Often, frame damage is difficult to see and can go unnoticed by insurance adjusters. The unfortunate truth is that even minor frame damage can put you, your family, your friends, and your car at risk when driving. When it goes unnoticed, it can often spell disaster for everyday drivers who might think their car is fine to drive.

When your car's frame is bent, your alignment is usually off, too, causing you to swerve and veer while driving. At best, this scenario results in unnecessary wear on your tires and, at worst, results in a car wreck. The bottom line? You need to get your car's frame inspected by a team of professional collision repair experts, even if you've only been involved in a minor accident.

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we take a comprehensive approach to frame repair and alignment. Our highly-trained frame repair technicians use a multi-point process to diagnose and correct your frame problems by:

  • Inspecting your car and its frame visually to discover any denting or bending.
  • Our alignment machine uses hydraulics and torque to strengthen your car's frame back to factory specs.
  • If our technicians spot damage, we'll begin the restoration process by placing your car on our frame alignment machine.
  • Once your frame is fixed, we'll answer any of your questions and will send you back on the road with a safe-to-drive vehicle.

Your First Choice for Collision Repair in Kiawah Island, SC

Chips and cracks are bad news for your car's windshield and don't just look bad - they can do serious damage when left unrepaired. Cracks and chips can quickly turn from a minor inconvenience to a safety hazard by impairing your vision. If your windshield crack is bad enough, you might even get pulled over by a police officer. Driving your vehicle with a large crack or even with an object embedded in it is a bad idea, but Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration is here to help.

Our windshield repair technicians have years of experience repairing car windows and windshields for many types of automobile glass, including side and rear windows. If you have been involved in a collision and need new glass, we can help facilitate that process and install a new windshield without you ever lifting a finger. New glass is usually needed with serious car wrecks, and it's always best to trust a professional auto body shop in cityname, state to get the job done. Our team uses the most modern glass and adhesives on the market, so you know your windshield and windows are high-quality and ready for the road.

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

Whether you have a chipped windshield or need all-new glass for your car, we're here to serve you.
Out car windshield and glass repairs include:

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

Door Glass

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

Vent Glass

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

Quarter Glass

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

Back Glass

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

Windshield Glass

Paintless Dent Removal in Kiawah Island

Any kind of item or stray piece of debris can dent your car. If you've been driving for at least a few years, chances are you've parked at a grocery store and, after shopping, returned to your car to see a big, unsightly dent. Whether they're due to inclement weather or rocks on the highway, dents cause noticeable damage that only gets worse with time. One of the most common dent repair solutions is paintless dent removal - a process that removes dents in your vehicle without removing any paint.

Paintless dent removal is great because it is not invasive and is a very efficient, cost-effective way to fix car dents before they get even worse. There are no fillers or sanding involved, making this option one of the quickest ways to remove dents. At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, our dent removal technicians use several tools to gently massage dents out of your car. When we're done, we'll smooth everything back into place, leaving your car looking like new.

To make matters even better, most paintless dent removal is supported by car insurance agencies, meaning you may not pay a cent out of pocket for our dent removal services.

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

Classic Car Restoration
in Kiawah Island

At Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration, we are very passionate about classic car restoration and offer a wide range of restoration services in Kiawah Island. We understand that no two classic car restoration projects are the same, which is why we offer a wide variety of services. We're talking mechanical upgrades, partial restorations, and full car restoration projects. If you have a repair, upgrade, or restoration plan in mind, chances are we can help you achieve your goals.

After we perform an initial inspection and provide you with a detailed estimate on the scope of work needed to restore your car, our seasoned technicians will get to work on your project.

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

Our full-scale classic car restoration process includes:

Auto Body Work Overhaul

Painting

Mechanical Repairs

Repair Interior

Custom Auto Body Painting in Kiawah Island

When was the last time you got compliments on your car's paint? If you loved your car's paint when it was brand new but hate what it looks like now, Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration can help you fall back in love with your vehicle. Whether your current paint job looks old and faded or you're craving a new color to show off, our paint technicians can deliver what you're looking for.

Between our advanced painting tools and uber-talented vehicle painting experts, our team can transform your car's aesthetic appeal, no matter the make and model. We can even fix dings and scratches in your paint while we're at it, so your car is shiny, smooth, and ready to turn heads.

We offer various auto painting services, from minor paint jobs to full-scale custom projects. We're happy to work with budgets of all sizes and can accommodate all of your painting needs, whether you want to paint a daily driver or a show car.

We recommend you call our office today, so we can get to know you a little better and understand what kind of paint job your car needs. We're happy to chat about cars and your paint job, even if you're just inquiring. After all, we're more than the best body shop in Kiawah Island - we're enthusiasts, too.

Auto Body Shop Kiawah Island, SC

Your First Choice for Collison
Repair in Kiawah Island, SC

If you're on the hunt for the highest-quality auto body repair services in South Carolina, backed by decades of experience, look no further than Lowcountry Paint Body & Restoration. We put our customer's needs first and strive to exceed expectations with every service we offer - all at a price you can afford. Swing by our body shop or contact our office today to discover why we're the Lowcountry's first choice in collision repair.

Troop-Films-LLC-phone-number(843) 996-4995

Free Estimates

Latest News in Kiawah Island, SC

From the mountains to the ocean, list ranks best golf courses in South Carolina

South Carolina is blessed with an embarrassment of riches in golf courses, a fact on display in examining one organization’s ranking of playing opportunities in the state.From the brawny Ocean Course at Kiawah Island Resort to the Aiken Golf Club that measures less than 5,800 yards and everything in between, the Palmetto State offers a smorgasbord of links that whets every golfer’s appetite.The South Carolina Golf C...

South Carolina is blessed with an embarrassment of riches in golf courses, a fact on display in examining one organization’s ranking of playing opportunities in the state.

From the brawny Ocean Course at Kiawah Island Resort to the Aiken Golf Club that measures less than 5,800 yards and everything in between, the Palmetto State offers a smorgasbord of links that whets every golfer’s appetite.

The South Carolina Golf Course Rating Panel’s annual survey emphasizes the obvious again in this year’s rankings of the best classic courses, designed pre-1980, and modern layout, those designed since 1980.

The Ocean Course, scene of high-profile events ranging from the 1991 Ryder Cup to PGA Championships in 2012 and 2021, takes its usual place at the top of the modern category. Harbour Town Golf Links at Hilton Head Island’s Sea Pines Resort, the home of the PGA Tour’s RBC Heritage each April, headlines the classics.

And those only scratch the surface.

“There are so many great golf courses in the state,” Aiken GC owner Jim McNair Jr. said. “There’s something from everyone. We have something like 37 acres of turf; I imagine a course like the Dunes (Golf and Beach Club in Myrtle Beach) has 100 acres or more.”

McNair’s course, located within shouting distance of Aiken’s business district, ranks seventh in the classic category and drips with history. More than 100 years old, the club is among the first to have women’s tees and staged the Women’s Invitational Tournament (1937-39) that brought stars such as Babe Zaharias and Patty Berg to compete.

“We’re short by today’s standards, but we have members who say it’s too hard from the tips,” McNair said. “The green complexes are incredible. The course is about strategy, accuracy and position off the tee.”

Those are among the qualities the rating panel seeks and finds everywhere in the state.

Courses represented in this year’s rankings range from Aiken’s Palmetto Golf Club, which dates to 1892; Seth Raynor’s Lowcountry gems; Camden Country Club with Donald Ross’ influence and Robert Trent Jones’ beauties among the classics. The modern layouts include the handiwork of, among others, Pete Dye, Tom Fazio, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Mike Strantz.

“Ranking the courses is really a challenge,” said Michael Whitaker, the association’s executive director. “As always, there are so many outstanding golf courses in South Carolina that you’re really splitting hairs in picking one over another.”

The top five in the classic category include Harbour Town, Yeamans Hall in Hanahan, Palmetto GC, the Dunes Golf and Beach Club, and Greenville CC’s Chanticleer Course. Joining the Ocean Course at the top of the modern list are the Secession Club (Beaufort), Congaree GC (Ridgeland), May River GC (Palmetto Bluff) and Sage Valley GC (Graniteville).

“To be included on a list with some of those exclusive private clubs is quite an honor,” McNair said. “That’s the beauty of the game. Courses such as ours and the Ocean Course are very different and yet are very challenging.”

The S.C. Golf Course Ratings Panel is composed of 125 golf enthusiasts who represent a diverse range of occupations, handicaps and backgrounds. The group’s objective is to promote excellence in the state’s golf course design and operation through competitive ranking, education and public advocacy. Criteria used in the judging include routing, variety, strategy, equity, memorability, aesthetics and experience. A panelist must have played the course to vote for it.

Classic Courses

(Designed Before 1980)

1. Harbour Town Golf Links

2. Yeamans Hall Club

3. Palmetto Golf Club

4. Dunes Golf and Beach Club

5. Greenville CC Chanticleer Course

6. CC of Charleston

7. Aiken Golf Club

8. Camden CC

9. Greenville CC Riverside Course

10. Surf Golf and Beach Club

11. Orangeburg CC

12. Florence CC

13. CC or Spartanburg

14. Myrtle Beach National King’s North Course

15. Columbia CC

16. Palmetto Dunes Resort R.T. Jones Course

17. Palmetto Dunes Resort George Fazio Course

18. Charleston Municipal Golf Course

19. Furman Golf Club

20. Pine Lakes CC

Modern Courses

(Designed Since 1980)

1. Kiawah Island Resort Ocean Course

2. Secession GC

3. Congaree GC

4. May River GC

5. Sage Valley GC

6. Cherokee Plantation

7. Kiawah Island Club Cassique Course

8. Long Cove Club

9, Chechessee Creek Club

10. Kiawah Island Club River Course

11. Bulls Bay Club

12. Caledonia Golf and Fish Club

13. Colleton River Plantation Dye Course

14. Old Tabby Links

15. Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards

16. Colleton River Plantation Nicklaus Course

17. Cliffs at Mountain Park.

18. Musgrove Mill GC

19. The GC at Briar’s Creek

20. Haig Point Club

21. Barefoot Resort Dye Course

22. Wachesaw Plantation Club

23. Belfair GC West Course

24. Reserve at Lake Keowee

25. Cliffs at Glassy

26. Tidewater GC and Plantation

27. Berkeley Hall North Course

28. Belfair GC East Course

29. True Blue Plantation

30. Grande Dunes Resort Club

31. Dataw Island Cotton Dyke Course

32. Wild Dunes Resort Links Course

33. Thornblade Club

34. Prestwick CC

35. Kiawah Island Resort Osprey Course

36. Cliffs at Keowee Falls

37. DeBordieu Club

38. Callawassie Island Club

T39. Oldfield

T39. Kiawah Island Resort Cougar Point Course

41. Reserve Club at Pawleys Island

41. Sea Pines Resort Atlantic Dunes Course

43. Daniel Island Club Beresford Creek Course

44. Kiawah Island Resort Turtle Point Course

45. Grande Dunes Members Club

46. Cliffs at Keowee Springs

47. Seabrook Island Club Ocean Winds Course

48. Berkeley Hall South Course

49. Cliffs Valley Course

50. Daniel Island Club Ralston Creek Course.

How South Carolina’s Kiawah Island strikes a balance between tourism and conservation

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier b...

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.

But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier beachfront homes. Kiawah Island has solidified itself as one of the most eco-friendly residential areas and tourist destinations in the United States, with conservation efforts dating back nearly half a century. Visitors are the beneficiaries of these extensive efforts, and the island is a rare example of how tourism and ecological concern can coexist.

In 1973, Kiawah Island established the Kiawah Turtle Patrol, an organization that tracks and protects the island’s native population of nesting loggerhead turtles. Soon after, Kiawah Investment, a Kuwaiti-owned company, purchased the island from heirs to a lumber company operator and, in 1975, conducted an environmental inventory of the island over the course of 16 months, studying natural habitats, wildlife and archaeological history, said Donna Windham, executive director of the Kiawah Conservancy.

The widespread inventory led to a master plan, which has since been enacted by the town of Kiawah, that combines environmental activism with tourism and leisure. “It was a whole new environment for them,” Windham said of the Kuwaiti effort. “They took it very seriously that this island was special.” Today, Windham said, the Kiawah Conservancy operates as a nonprofit land trust for the island, encouraging the protection of the environment by working in conjunction with landowners.

The conservancy, established in 1997, can hold land and issue easements. It has, to date, preserved “2,273 acres of Kiawah’s 10,000 acres,” according to the island’s website. In January 2000, Windham said, 152 acres of land known as Little Bear Island — a nesting destination for coastal birds such as the piping plover, peregrine falcon and osprey — were preserved by the Wetlands America Trust, part of the Ducks Unlimited nonprofit conservation group. The easement was updated in 2007 to include protection from the trust and the Kiawah Island Natural Habitat Conservancy.

As a traveler, you may see no concrete indication of the infrastructure that governs the island’s conservation. Yet the influence is everywhere, evident in the clamoring hermit crabs at the shoreline, the robust oyster beds that climb upward on the riverbanks, and the petite raccoons that scale trees at dusk in search of their next meal.

Close to the island’s Ocean Course, where a strip of cerulean is just visible beyond the marsh, a passerby might be privy to any number of natural encounters: alligators with snouts just visible in the pond water; hook-necked blue herons staring out into the palmettos; white-tailed deer bedding down beneath the drapery of Spanish moss. These moments, despite their frequency, arrive as a surprise in a place where golf clubs and impeccable architecture are the local currency.

But you’re more likely than not to encounter a wild animal during your visit, and that’s because Kiawah Island includes 3,000 acres of tidal salt marsh and 10 miles of shoreline, providing shelter for a variety of wildlife. According to town of Kiawah Wildlife Biologist Jim Jordan — his position was created in 2000 and, eight years later, Assistant Wildlife Biologist Aaron Given arrived — there are 315 species of birds, more than 30 species of mammals, more than 40 species of reptiles, more than 20 species of amphibians, and thousands of invertebrates that call the island home.

“It’s pretty unique,” Jordan said. It is, he said, “a functioning, intact ecosystem that’s working the way it would have worked if there were no houses there.”

One of the island’s most fascinating predators is the bobcat; the current bobcat population, Jordan said, is between 15 and 20. Four to six bobcats are collared by the biology team each year, so their movements can be tracked via GPS. “Visitors and residents can look at the tracking maps online and see where they’ve been,” he said.

Take a boat out onto the serene Kiawah River — you can book tours through the island’s sole resort, the Kiawah Island Golf Resort — and you’re bound to see a dolphin or two, gray fin slipping in and out of the water. These are the island’s bottlenose species, and they’re friendly, tracking vessels and providing the occasional show, flippers aflight. They also engage in a unique behavior known as “strand-feeding.”

“In a coordinated effort, they will basically force a school of fish or a school of shrimp up toward the bank,” Jordan said. “They beach themselves.” The western end of the island makes for good viewing of this behavior, although he warned that disrupting dolphins during their strand-feeds can be harmful. “It’s a learned behavior,” passed down from generation to generation, Jordan said. Should a strand-feed get interrupted, dolphins could abandon the behavior entirely, thus keeping future generations from learning how to eat in this location-specific manner.

The serenity experienced on this island oasis is thanks to more than just the work of the conservancy. At the Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, for instance, an AAA five-diamond resort that was built in 2004, live, mature oak trees were transplanted to help promote the maintenance of the natural environment. “This really wasn’t required. It was just something that we did voluntarily, because we thought it was the right thing to do,” said Bryan Hunter, director of public relations for the Kiawah Island Golf Resort.

The resort, he said, places a premium on conservation efforts, encouraging guests to immerse themselves in the local environment through organized boat trips to other barrier islands, alligator safaris and dolphin-viewing excursions. Visitors can also tag along with the Turtle Patrol in the morning in search of hatching and migration patterns (although that program has been greatly restricted because of the coronavirus pandemic). Some may even get to assist hatchling turtles, Hunter said. Those who join the Turtle Patrol outings look for nests, take notes and record observations about the year’s hatch.

One conservation effort enforced by island residents — including hoteliers — is the Lights Out for Sea Turtles initiative, which requires that beach-illuminating lights be turned off in the evenings during loggerhead nesting season. As Jordan pointed out, artificial light confuses hatchling turtles, often accidentally guiding them away from the ocean.

Low light pollution, Hunter said, is “vital.” “The resort, along with the rest of the island, through town ordinance, makes sure that we really carefully monitor light pollution along the beach, so that it doesn’t disorient nesting sea turtles or hatching sea turtles,” he said.

As the sun descends at dusk, there is a vibration in the air. Is it the cicadas, on their 17-year cycle? Or maybe just a faraway flock of birds? Whatever the origin of the ambient noise, it calls to mind a soothing bedtime melody, the kind you might slip into as you wind down into sleep.

This AAA five-diamond property has 255 guest rooms and suites, as well as multiple dining venues and direct beach access. Rooms from about $240.

Run by the Kiawah Island Golf Resort, this 1.5-hour boat excursion takes guests through creeks and marshes in search of the island’s native bottlenose dolphin population. $450 for up to six passengers.

Situated on the west end of the island, this ocean beach offers the only public access on Kiawah. Amenities include lifeguards, chair and umbrella rentals, restrooms, outdoor showers, a snack bar and a picnic area with grills. Parking $5 to $15 per vehicle.

Guests can ask resident wildlife biologists about the local ecology and visit with some of the native and nonnative species, such as diamondback terrapins and a 10-foot-long Burmese python. The center’s gift shop sells handcrafted items made by local artists. Free.

Walk or bike this one-mile scenic trail that extends over the marsh to a lookout tower. Part of the larger Kiawah Island bike trails system, which covers about 30 miles, this trail is suitable for all ages.

North Charleston Arts Fest is back with local and regional talent

The North Charleston Arts Fest returns this week, May 4-8, for another year of exciting performing and visual arts. Featuring the works of some of Charleston’s most talented artists and fun guests from across South Carolina, this year’s Arts Fest is shaping up to be a wonderful — and free — weekend.North Charleston Arts Fest is produced every year by the North Charleston Cultural Arts Department. The five-day event has, over the past 38 years, featured some of the best local and regional artists and performers....

The North Charleston Arts Fest returns this week, May 4-8, for another year of exciting performing and visual arts. Featuring the works of some of Charleston’s most talented artists and fun guests from across South Carolina, this year’s Arts Fest is shaping up to be a wonderful — and free — weekend.

North Charleston Arts Fest is produced every year by the North Charleston Cultural Arts Department. The five-day event has, over the past 38 years, featured some of the best local and regional artists and performers. The festival began in 1982 as a one-day Park Circle event for local residents. It has since grown into one of Charleston’s premiere annual events.

As in previous years, this year’s events are free. The schedule offers something for everyone, across an incredible spectrum of artistic disciplines.

Visual arts fans will have plenty to take in. There’s this year’s winning poster design: “Memories 222” by Deborah Kind. “Memories 222” is a mixed media piece created with paint and pens, incorporating collage, stenciling and stamping techniques. Kind is a recently retired school teacher and full-time artist who lives on Kiawah Island. She’s no stranger to the Arts Fest, having won several awards in the Judged Fine Art Competition in prior years. The piece will be part of the City of North Charleston’s Public Art Collection.

The annual Fine Art and Photography Competitions will again take place. Fine Art will feature eight different exhibition categories: acrylic, oil, drawing, pastel, watercolor, printmaking, printed new media and 2-D mixed media. The professional and amateur photography competition will feature color and monochrome categories.

And that’s not all. Local muralist and toy maker Patch Whiskey is hosting an open studio from 6-10 p.m., May 7, that will feature his works, merch and libations. The National Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition, South Carolina Palmetto Hands Fine Craft Competition, African American Fiber Art Exhibition and Youth Art Competitions will also take place. Exhibitions can be found at the North Charleston Riverfront Park (Outdoor Sculpture), Charleston Area Convention Center (Palmetto Hands and Youth) and North Charleston City Hall (Af-Am Fiber Art).

The Youth Art Competition, which will feature artwork from public and private schools and individual students from Charleston, Dorchester and Berkeley counties, isn’t the only place for the young ones to get involved during Arts Fest. Bright Star Touring Theatre will present an adaptation of the beloved The Wizard of Oz at 10:30 a.m., May 4. Their version is an interactive retelling of the L. Frank Baum classic as told by two actors.

Another family fun event is the Professor Whizzpop magic show at 3:30 p.m., May 6, at Oak Terrace Preserve Pavilion. The show is geared towards younger audiences and promises laughs, amazing magic and loads of audience participation.

“It’s going to be great to get back to live shows in Charleston with the North Charleston Arts Festival!” said Tom Hughes, who plays Professor Whizzpop. “Kids aged 4-10 will have a blast!”

For more fun and laughs geared toward adults, head to Dashi on, May 5 for the Wham, Bam, Cam Bertrand … and Friends comedy show. Bill Davis is your host, along with Cam Bertrand, Dedrick Flynn and North Charleston’s own Jeremy McLellan. McLellan has been touring the world with his standup show, and now, that exciting act will return to Charleston.

Spoken word and poetry have a place at this year’s Arts Fest, and that place is Garco Green in the Park Circle neighborhood (4910 O’Hear Ave.). Carlos Johnson, aka Los tha Host, will host a show that features students from Berkeley Center for the Arts and the Speak Freely Foundation. Joey Tucker and Georgia Nubia will also be on-hand to read. DJ G-Money will score the show on May 7.

Gospel music lovers can catch Project L.O.V.E., featuring The Tony Washington Singers, at 5 p.m., May 7, at Fox Music House. At 7 p.m., YeeHaw Junction brings bluegrass to Nippitaty Distillery with Jeff Meierer on mandolin, Kristen Meierer on upright bass, David Grant on guitar, Tadd Huff on banjo and Lisa Deakins on the fiddle. And at noon, May 8, Small Opera will present a pop-up concert of opera, musical theater and standard hits at the MOMO Riverfront Park.

For a full list of events for Arts Fest, including the Clock Party and Art Exhibition receptions, head to northcharlestonartsfest.com/events.

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Kiawah Island sales topped $1B in 2021

The ocean-hugging upscale resort of Kiawah Island reached a new milestone in 2021 with more than $1 billion in property sales.Kiawah Island Real Estate, which handles the majority of sales in the gated community, ended the year with $795.7 million in sales plus others that will close in the new year for a total of $1 billion in sales, a 40 percent increase from 2020.When sales by other agencies are factored in, the total climbs to $1.05 billion, up 30 percent overall from the roughly $808 milli...

The ocean-hugging upscale resort of Kiawah Island reached a new milestone in 2021 with more than $1 billion in property sales.

Kiawah Island Real Estate, which handles the majority of sales in the gated community, ended the year with $795.7 million in sales plus others that will close in the new year for a total of $1 billion in sales, a 40 percent increase from 2020.

When sales by other agencies are factored in, the total climbs to $1.05 billion, up 30 percent overall from the roughly $808 million recorded the previous year, according to Kiawah Island Real Estate.

Last year, the agency saw 493 closings, a 21 percent increase from 2020 and a 165 percent jump from 2019.

The island as a whole reported 734 closings, up 12 percent and 130 percent from the prior two years, respectively.

The record-breaking year included the most expensive residential property to change hands in the Charleston area to date. The Vanderhorst Mansion, set on 16.5 acres on the edge of the Kiawah River and dating to the early 1800s, sold June 24 for $20.5 million.

Kiawah Island Real Estate also is handling sales and reservations for two other developments set to hit the market this year.

The Burn at Cassique will offer seven homesites along the Tom Watson-designed golf course at the private Cassique Golf Club. Pricing will be available in late January.

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On the inland side of town, the agency is handling reservations for Seafields at Kiawah Island, a luxury community for the 62-plus group.

The $180 million development, which broke ground last September, will feature 90 luxury one-, two- and three-bedroom residences, as well as 16 assisted-living units and continuing care services. It also will include a first-of-its-kind, in-house medical clinic operated by the Medical University of South Carolina.

The development is being built off of Seabrook Island Road near Freshfields Village Shopping Center. Construction is scheduled for completion by the fall of 2024.

As of early January 2022, 43 percent of the independent living units had been reserved.

NC deal

A Charleston-based real estate company will develop an $80 million grocery-anchored project in North Carolina.

Adams Property Group will build a 48,387-square-foot Publix, 19,800 square feet of retail space and a 290-unit apartment complex in West Edge in Winston-Salem.

Construction is expected to start in a couple of months. Adams is handling the leasing.

Exploring Kiawah Island, South Carolina’s private getaway, where day visitors are welcome (by most, anyway)

KIAWAH ISLAND, South Carolina – The young man behind the counter at the West Beach pool helped me pick out a bike, handed me a map and told me to have fun.What a contrast to the security attendant I encountered a few moments before, who made me feel like an interloper at the gated entrance to Kiawah Island.I brushed aside her grouchiness and headed out on two wheels, pedaling first through the island’s leafy interior before heading to the beach, where the sand at low tide cuts an incredible coastal path along the At...

KIAWAH ISLAND, South Carolina – The young man behind the counter at the West Beach pool helped me pick out a bike, handed me a map and told me to have fun.

What a contrast to the security attendant I encountered a few moments before, who made me feel like an interloper at the gated entrance to Kiawah Island.

I brushed aside her grouchiness and headed out on two wheels, pedaling first through the island’s leafy interior before heading to the beach, where the sand at low tide cuts an incredible coastal path along the Atlantic.

Kiawah, the mostly private barrier island about 25 miles south of Charleston, is often included on lists of the world’s most beautiful beaches. For that reason alone, I put the island on the top of my to-do list as I planned a short trip to South Carolina to try out the new Breeze Airways flights out of Akron-Canton Airport.

It’s not the simplest place to visit, however, especially if you’re not spending the night.

Staying overnight

There’s one hotel on the island, the tony Sanctuary, a gorgeous, ocean-front AAA five-diamond property with 255 rooms. Rates here run $500 and up during the summer, which was too steep for me.

Instead, I overnighted at a hotel on U.S. 17, a 30-minute drive away, and planned a day trip to the island. Shortly after arrival, however, I wasn’t entirely sure that my plan was a good one.

I had called earlier to make a reservation for the Jasmine Porch, inside the Sanctuary, one of the island’s numerous restaurants. It’s one of several ways that non-guests are encouraged to visit the island, owned primarily by the Kiawah Island Golf Resort and other real estate development companies.

I made it to Kiawah by 10 a.m. on a recent Sunday, told the woman at the gate that I had a restaurant reservation and asked for a map of the island. She told me I wasn’t to linger on the island and wouldn’t give me a map.

“But I’m planning on renting bikes,” I told her. “You’re not allowed to rent bikes,” she told me.

That came as news to the young man at the nearby West Beach pool, who told me I was welcome to rent a bicycle and to pedal anywhere I liked. “Security being security,” he said, and shrugged.

Indeed, non-guests are also welcome to sign up for recreational activities and nature programs, including dolphin encounters, kayak tours, art classes and more.

They’re even allowed to golf – and this island is well known for its spectacular and prestigious courses, including the waterfront Ocean Course, which hosted the 2021 PGA Championship in May. Five courses are open to the public, whether you’re staying on the island or not, including the Pete Dye-designed Ocean Course, Cougar Point, Turtle Point, Osprey Point and Oak Point.

I’m not a golfer, which kept my to-do list simple for my short visit: Explore the island by bike, enjoy a nice meal, check out the beach, maybe witness some wildlife.

I popped into the Nature Center, too, for some air conditioned-relief, where I saw numerous snakes, turtles, a stuffed bobcat and two infant alligators in tanks (the only gators I saw during my visit, despite omnipresent signage warning visitors to stay away from ponds and waterways).

I enjoyed almost all of it – the biking was terrific, with 30 miles of shady, flat, paved paths that rarely intersected with the roadways; and the Southern cuisine at Jasmine Porch was excellent, featuring she-crab soup and crab cakes plus bottomless peach iced tea. The beach, as expected, was absolutely stunning, massive at low tide, flat and perfect for walking, cycling, lounging, even bocce playing.

The attitude of the folks manning the security gates, however, was decidedly unwelcoming. Perhaps purposely so?

Cocktails at the Ocean Course

After we returned our bikes, my husband and I decided to have a drink at the Ryder Cup Bar, at the far east end of the island, overlooking the spectacular 18th hole of the Ocean Course. Our waitress at lunch assured us that the bar was open to the public.

There is a second security gate about midway down the island, which controls access to the eastern half of Kiawah. I told the woman at the gate that we were headed to the Ryder Cup Bar.

She saw the pass from earlier in the day on our car’s dashboard and asked us if we had been to the beach. “Um, yes,” I answered. She then told us that we should not have been on the beach. “If we let everyone on the beach, there wouldn’t be enough room for the people who pay a premium for access,” she said.

That did not seem to be remotely a possibility, given the size of the beach here. But I smiled and nodded.

In a more friendly tone, she said she would make an exception for us, and handed us a pass to proceed to the bar. I thanked her while controlling the urge to roll my eyes.

My husband was put off by her attitude that seemed to suggest we weren’t welcome. I was amused, but also confused.

Other than the security staff, everyone we encountered on the island – vacationers, homeowners, wait staff, shopkeepers – were all wonderful and welcoming. They seemed to want us around.

The drive out to the Ocean Course was stunning, past spectacular, multimillion-dollar-plus properties, along live-oak lined roadways that were draped with Spanish moss.

At the end of the drive: the Ryder Cup Bar, where I very much enjoyed a cocktail called a sweet tea mojito. I sipped my beverage and enjoyed the view.

Thirst (and curiosity) quenched, we made our way back west, toward the only public destination on the island, Kiawah Beachwalker Park, part of the Charleston County Parks system (note: parking here is $15).

While technically all beaches in South Carolina are public, private landowners can (and do) restrict access to those beaches.

Beachwalker park provides public access to Kiawah’s entire 10-mile stretch of sand. Theoretically, a visitor could access the beach here and traverse (by foot or bicycle) the entire stretch of the Kiawah coast.

I wasn’t that ambitious, walking perhaps a mile to the island’s western end, where the Kiawah River joins the ocean. I was hoping to see some dolphins strand feeding, a fascinating practice where the dolphins herd fish onto the sand then launch themselves out of the water to eat. Kiawah, nearby Hilton Head and other low-lying coastal regions are among the handful of places throughout the world where this occurs, typically just before or after low tide.

Alas, I didn’t see any dolphins, but the beach was engaging enough – wide and flat and glorious.

I could have walked longer, but my feet were tired, the sun was setting and my hotel was a half hour drive away.

If you go: Kiawah Island, South Carolina

Getting there: Kiawah is about 25 miles southwest of Charleston, an easy drive from the airport or downtown.

Staying overnight: The Sanctuary offers 255 oceanfront rooms, starting at about $500 per night during the summer. Other options include the Andell Inn, part of the Freshfields Village development, just off Kiawah on St. Johns Island.

The island also has hundreds of villas and private homes available to rent via the Kiawah Island Golf Resort or individual owners.

More information: kiawahresort.com, kiawahisland.com, charlestoncvb.com

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